What are the modern areas of maths?

Traditional areas of maths like algebra, calculus or trig don't seem a good way to think about subdividing the subject in the modern world.

You might ask, why subdivide at all?

In a sense, you shouldn't. The expert mathematician utilises whichever maths areas helps them solve the problem at hand. Breadth and ingenuity of application is often key.

But maths represents a massive body of knowledge and expertise, subdividing helps us to think about different areas, for curricula to focus their energies enough that there's sufficient depth of experience gained by students at a given time to get a foothold.

However I believe the subdivisions should be grouped by modern uses of maths, not ancient divisions of tools.

So here goes with our 5 major areas:

  • Data Science (everything data, incorporating but expanding statistics and probability).
  • Geometry (an ancient subject, but highly relevant today)
  • Information Theory (everything signals--whether images or sound. Right name for area?).
  • Modelling (techniques for good application of maths for real world problems)
  • Architecture of Maths (understanding the coherence of maths that builds its power, closely related to coding).

Comments welcome!

PISA results: Let's win on the right playing field, not lose on the wrong one

PISA results: Let's win on the right playing field, not lose on the wrong one

Today's maths PISA results are predictable in the successes that many Asian countries show and the mediocrity of many of the traditional Western countries--like the UK. 

I believe PISA is meticulous in conducting its tests and reflects a good evaluation of standards of today's maths education. And yet I think if countries like the UK simply try to climb up today's PISA assessment, they'd be doing the wrong thing.

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Excited: Raspberry Pi gets free Mathematica + Wolfram language

Excited: Raspberry Pi gets free Mathematica + Wolfram language

I was very excited at our CBM summit this morning with Eben Upton to announce that Mathematica will be bundled on the Raspberry Pi computer for free, and so will the new Wolfram Language--also announced today.

This really has at least 4-dimensions of consequence:

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Collaborating with UNICEF: next month's CBM summit on fixing world's maths

Collaborating with UNICEF: next month's CBM summit on fixing world's maths

Fixing maths education is becoming ever more central to individual life-chances and our societal needs.

So I am very pleased that we're able to collaborate with UNICEF on our 3rd CBM summit, holding it at their headquarters in New York City on November 21-22.

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Maths v. Music Education

Maths v. Music Education

I was debating Computer-Based Maths education (CBM) with a sceptic before the summer and he brought up the analogy of music education to support various claims he was making of maths.

As I understood his central point it was that practising hand calculations is akin to practising music pieces--it's simply the way to learn to play. Also there was some attempt to draw the analogy between listening to music and CBM, whereas playing was like traditional hand-calculating maths.

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